Melbourne Cup: Put a Hat On

gb

With the event that is in everyone’s mouth having arrived, I wanted to take a closer look at what the Melbourne Cup signifies for the fashion industry. While perfectly tailored and classy dresses are certainly important, the actual focus lies not the horses but the ladies’ fashionable headwear.

Walking into the fabulously classy Block Arcade in Melbourne, it was hard to miss the millinery exhibition running during the Melbourne Spring Fashion Week a while ago. All the bright colours with timeless black elements, intricately shaped feathers and delicate decoration, draped in various shapes and sizes to be the metaphorical cherry on top of its wearer. Especially with the racing cup coming up, millinery is a wardrobe essential.

P1150957
P1150959
P1150962

Sandy from Hats by Sandy A

Naturally, I had to learn more about this particular branch of design which to me, is an art form in itself. I spoke to Sandy from Hats by Sandy A, who came down all the way from tropical Queensland to chilly Melbourne on an invite by the Millinery Association of Australia to display and sell her hats for the Fashion Week. She has been doing this now every year for 5 years in a row but still gets a rush of excitement coming here. “It is quite exciting, actually”, she tells me.
I wondered, does an event like this inspire her for new designs or where does she find her muse? For her inspiration comes from all kinds of different sources and just appears “out of my head.” This leads to a different approach each time she works on a hat. “Once I start on something it’s completely different and of course you see there is nothing the same.” When she arrived in Melbourne, she was already well prepared for the upcoming festivities that require artsy hats. “You come up with new designs over the time and you’re actually going in there and display them and sell them cause everybody is looking for their new designer headwear for Melbourne Spring Carnival.”
A common misunderstanding when looking at how hats are created is thinking that it is simply putting bits and pieces together nicely and making it stick with glue. A milliner must be able to do a lot of things elegantly. Not only does he need to be crafty but also be a seamstress and a designer. “It’s all part and parcel of millinery – learning to do everything by your own. It is more like a traditional trade. […] It’s not gluing and sticking your work together, it’s hand sowing and also coming up with the designs that look pretty or special”.

In line with the various unique designs, the materials also have to be versatile and match the idea. Again, creativity sets in with Sandy cleverly using any material from aluminium fly screen wire, double shot crinoline or silk applications. Of course, it is not only her own input that flows into the creation of a millinery piece, but the clients come up with specific requirements themselves in addition to that. “I have a lot of clients that come to me and say what they like. We can look at their face shape, we can look at their head size, their garments, we look at their accessories and then we go ahead and make something that’s gonna look stunning for [them].”
So in the end, the piece is a very personal thing that matches the wearer’s taste and style. “It’s really what suits the client too because some […] don’t like a lot of feathers” is just one example she mentions. Feathers she has got a lot, though, loving to shape, cut and tint them to achieve the craziest styles. How does one curl a feather, I wanted to know. “It’s a process. First of all I suppose you gotta soften it with the steam and with the iron,” she goes on to explain. This effort does not only go in arranging feathers, which are an important part in her work. After all, it is not just curling, but also cutting, shaping and tinting them as well as everything else that takes time and a lot of passion. “The more you’re into millinery, the more you learn,” she comments wisely. Ultimately, this is how she has learned to perfect this craft over time.

Her final advice to me is to pursue an interest in this field of design. Millinery might only be a small part of an outfit, but it makes all the difference and the trade itself is special: “You’re missing out. You should take some interest in it, it’s pretty exciting.”

P1150973
P1150974
P1150980

Karin from Millinery by Karin

A happy anniversary to Karin from Millinery by Karin, who has been in the millinery business for 50 years. She has always been very passionate about it, coming from a racing family. Even today she still dreams of her peaceful and inspiring childhood that set the foundation for her choice of career later in life. “It was beautiful. We had beautiful colours and when I was a girl, I decided when I grew up to be a dressmaker and do millinery.”
As if being lucky enough to find her destiny so early in life, Karin is also blessed with creativity on creating hats from everything, ranging from straws over to silk. In the creative process she leads herself be guided rather than making a plan. “I don’t do design,” she highlights.
Despite her more intuitive approach, Karin has an ultimate agenda. “I love making ladies beautiful.” And beauty she finds in the little details, looking for it every single day. “Every day I see things. It could be art in the streets, it could be handbags, shoes, it could be a lady’s outfit, it could be a piece of material, it could be a button.” Her ideas are boundless, such as her designs. For her work, she has placed high standards upon herself. Every hat, according to Karin, has to be “classical, really, rather than frilly and fluffy and over the top. And I like quality of workmanship, so the quality look of a lady.” Creating the look of a true lady is what it is all about for Karin.
A hat can make or break the outfit and as the old saying goes, the dress makes the man. It is fascinating how a man’s hat can evoke the terms charming, debonair and dashing in people’s minds. “I love it too – a man in the hat.” The same goes for women, a headpiece is a complete style changer, but not just that, it also changes how other people perceive the wearer. On this, Karin muses perceptively: “You must notice yourself, how people treat you when you […] have a hat on. They are actually more respectful. They treat women differently, when you’re dressed to look stylish.”
Naturally, style and class are fiercely sought after during Melbourne Cup, which is a time for Karin when she gets a lot of requests for custom made headpieces. Apart from that, the professional milliner also caters to other special festivities, such as weddings where she perfects the outfits of both bride and groom. In summary, Karin does “anything to do with the head, really.”
Craving a more sophisticated look after all this backpacking, I of course wanted to have a ‘piece of the cake’ and what do you know, Karin had the perfect fit for me right there. Matching my current hair colour, with black details and a cute ribbon, it immediately landed on my head, placed there by Karin’s eager hands herself. Voilá, I found my perfect piece of millinery. Karin not only finds hats for heads but for pieces as well. Once there was a woman owning a button, for which she was frustratingly unable to find a good use for and Karin had just the idea. It complimented one of her unfinished hats and is now a very valued piece of her collection, on display in her window. “That’s just what the hat needed”. And I’m sure Karin will always find the right touch for your hat or the right hat for your touch of classy.

Contact

Hats by Sandy A
27/25-27 Hillview Dr
Buderim QLD 4556
0400022303

Millinery by Karin
Level 1, Centreway Arcade,
259 Collins Street
0395302201
0405037598

de


Mit der Ankunft des Events, das in aller Munde ist, will auch ich einen genaueren Blick darauf werfen, was der Melbourne Cup für die Modeindustrie bedeutet. Während perfekt geschneiderte und klassische Kleider sicherlich wichtig sind, ist sind es doch die ausgefallenen Kopfbedckungen, die alle Augen auf sich zehen.

Auf meinem Weg durch die fabelhafte Block Arcade in Melbourne, war die Hutausstellung während der Melbourne Fashion Week vor einiger Zeit nur schwer zu übersehen. Mit all den bunten Farben mit zeitlosen schwaren Elementen, feinfühlig angebrachten Federn und zarten Dekorationen in verschiedenen Größen und Formen sind die extravaganten Kreationen das i-Tüpfelchen zu jedem festlichen Outfit. Besonders beim Pferderennen sind hervorstechende Hüte ein Muss.

P1150957
P1150959
P1150962

Sandy von Hats by Sandy A


Natürlich wollte ich so viel wie möglich lernen über dieses Feld des Modedesigns, was für mich schon an Kunst grenzt. Ich sprach mit Sandy von Hats by Sandy A, die den ganzen weiten Weg vom tropischen Queensland nach Melbourne zurückgelegt hatte, auf eine Einladung hin von der Hutmachervereinigung von Australien, um ihre Hüte auf der Fashion Week an die Frau zu bringen. Sie ist nun schon das fünfte Jahr dabei und bald schon ein alter Hase hier. Dennoch begeistert sie das Umfeld jedes Mal aufs Neue: „Es ist wirklich aufregend.“

Ich fragte mich, ob sie Festlichkeiten wie diese zu neuen Kreationen inspirieren oder wo sie ihre Muse ansonsten finden würde. Für Sandy gibt es nur eine Inspirationsquelle, es „ist alles in meinem Kopf“. Dies führt zu unterschiedlichen Ansatzweisen für jeden ihrer Hüte. Keiner gleicht dem anderen, denn es sind alles Unikate. „Wenn ich einmal angefangen habe, ist [das Design] ganz anders und nichts dasselbe.“ Als sie in Melbourne ankam, war sie bereits gut gewappnet für jegliche Festlichkeiten, die stilechte Hutbedeckungen benötigen. „Mit der Zeit fallen einem neue Designs ein und dann kommt man her, stellt sie aus und verkauft sie, weil jeder nach der neuen Designerhutmode für Melbourne Spring Carnival sucht.“

Ein weitverbreiteter Irrglaube, der dem Hutmachen anhängt, ist, dass alles arrangiert und dann zusammengeklebt wird. Ein Hutmacher muss viele verschiedene Fähigkeiten elegant verbinden können. Nicht nur, dass man handwerklich begabt sein sollte, sondern zugleich muss man auch nähen können und ein Auge fürs Design haben. „Es geht alles zum Gesamtpaket der Hutmacherei – man muss sich alles selber beibringen. Es ist eher ein traditionelles Gewerbe. […] Es ist nicht einfach kleben und alles zusammenstecken, es ist mit der Hand nähen und sich Designs ausdenken, die hübsch oder besonders aussehen.“

Zusammen mit den verschiedenen einzigartigen Entwürfen, müssen auch die Materialien vielseitig sein und zur Idee passen. Auch hier ist wieder Kreativität gefragt und Sandy macht sich verschiedene Materialien zu Nutze, von Aluminiumfliegengitter, doppeltem Krinolin hin zu Seidenapplikationen. Natürlich sind es nicht nur ihr eigener Input, der in die Kreation eines Hutes einfließt, sondern auch die Ideen der Kunden selber. „Ich habe viele Kunden, die zu mir kommen und sagen, was sie möchten. Wir können uns dann ihre Gesichtsform anschauen, wie groß ihr Kopf ist, ihre Kleidung, wir schauen uns auch ihre Assessoires an und dann geht es weiter und ich erschaffe etwas, das ganz besonders [an ihnen] aussieht.“

Letztendlich wird das Meisterwerk etwas ganz persönliches und passt perfekt zum Geschmack und Stil der Trägerin. „Es kommt wirklich darauf an, was zu einem passt, denn einige […] mögen keine vielen Federn.“ Und Federn spielen eine große Rolle in ihrer Hutkollektion. Sandy liebt es Federn in Form zu bringen, sie zu schneiden und einzufärben, um die ausgefallendsten Looks zu erschaffen. Wie rollt man denn eine Feder, fragte ich die talentierte Hutmacherin. „Es ist ein Prozess,“ erklärt Sandy. „ Zuallererst nehme ich an, dass man sie in etwas weicher machen muss mit Dampf und einem Bügeleisen.“ Diesen Aufwand hat man aber nicht nur mit Federn, sondern auch mit allen anderen Abschnitten. Alles braucht seine Zeit und eine große Portion Leidenschaft. „Umso mehr man von der Hutmacherei begeistert ist, umso mehr lernt man,“ fügt sie weise hinzu. Letztendlich hat sie so dieses Handwerk perfektionieren können.

Ihr Ratschlag zum Abschied lautet, ein Interesse an diesem traditionellen Breich der Modeindustrie zu entwickeln. Hutmacherei ist zwar nur für einen kleinen Teil eines kompletten Looks zuständig, macht aber den großen Unterschied und das Handwerk selber ist schon etwas ganz besonderes: „Du verpasst etwas. Du solltest ein Interesse daran entwickeln, denn es ist wirklich aufregend.“

P1150973
P1150974
P1150980

Karin von Millinery by Karin


Herzlichen Glückwunsch an Karin von Millinery by Karin, die dieses Jahr ihr fünfzigjähriges Jubiläum im Hutmacherberuf feiert. Sie war schon immer sehr leidenschaftlich dabei, da sie von einer Rennfamilie kommt. Auch heute noch erinnert sie sich gerne an ihre schöne Kindheit, die für sie den Grundstein ihrer späteren Karriere legte. „Es war wunderbar. Wir hatten wunderschöne Farben und als ich noch ein Mädchen war, entschloss ich mich einmal Schneiderin zu werden und Hüte zu entwerfen sobald ich groß wäre.“

Als ob sie nicht schon Glück genug gehabt hätte bereits von klein an zu wissen, welcher Weg für sie bestimmt war, ist Karin auch gesegnet mit eienr großen Portion Kreativität. Sie kann aus allem einen Hut zaubern, sei es Stroh oder Seide. Im kreativen Entstehungsprozess lässt sie sich eher treiben, anstatt einen Plan zu machen. „Ich designe nicht,“ meint Karin.

Trotz ihrer eher intuitiven Vorgehensweise, hat Karin einen Masterplan. „Ich liebe es Ladies schön zu machen.“ Und Schönheit entdeckt sie überall, in kleinen Details, täglich. „Jeden Tag sehe ich Dinge. Es kann ein Straßenkunstwerk sein, oder Handtaschen, Schuhe, es kann ein Damenoutfit sein, es kann ein Stück Material sein, sogar ein Knopf.“ Ihre Ideen sind grenzenlos, so wie ihre Entwürfe. In ihrer Arbeit hat sich die Hutmacherin hohe Standards auferlegt. Jeder Hut, so Karin, muss „wirklich klassisch sein, anstatt aufgerüscht, flauschig und überspitzt. Und ich mag die Qualität von meisterlicher Handarbeit, also den qualitativ hochwertigen Look einer Dame.“ Ebendiesen Eindruck zu erwecken, ist für Karin von besonderer Wichtigkeit.

Ein Hut kann ein ganzes Outfit verändern. Wie sagt man doch so schön, Kleider machen Leute. Es ist faszinierend, wie man(n) mit einem Hut gleich die Begriffe charmant, stattlich und weltgewandt verbindet. „Ich liebe es auch – ein Mann in einem Hut.“ Dasselbe gilt für Frauen. Eine neue Kopfbedeckung macht den Unterschied in sowohl Stil als auch wie frau von anderen wahrgenommen wird. Dazu bemerkt Karin folgendes: „Das musst du auch selbst mitbekommen haben, wie Leute einen anders behandeln, sobald man einen Hut aufhat. Sie sind dann tatsächlich respektvoller. Frauen werden anders behandelt, wenn man stilsicher gekleidet ist.“

Natürlich sind gerade Stil und Eleganz ein wichtiges Merkmal für den Melbourne Cup und genau zu dieser Zeit bekommt Karin auch viele neue Angebote für maßgeschneiderte Stücke. Abgesehen davon, zaubert die begabte Hutmacherin auch zu anderen besonderen Anlässen, wie zum Beispiel Hochzeiten für sowohl Männer als auch Frauen. Kurz gesagt, macht Karin alles, „was mit dem Kopf zu tun hat.“

Nach all meiner Backpackerei, wollte auch ich einmal ein elegantes „Stück vom Kuchen“ abhaben und wer hätte es gedacht, auch für mich hatte Karin den idealen Hut. Passend zu meiner damaligen Haarfarbe, mit schwarzen Details und einer süßen Schleife, kam es sofort auf meinen Kopf ß von Karin selbst dort platziert. Tadaa, so fand ich meine perfekte Kopfbedeckung. Karin findet aber nicht nur die richtigen Köpfe für Hüte, sondern auch die richtigen Hüte für Dinge. Es gab da zum Beispiel einmal eine Frau, die einfach keine richtige Verwendung für einen bestimmten Knopf finden konnte und für genau diesen hatte sie die Idee. Es passte genau auf einen ihrer unfertigen Hüte und vervollständigte diesen. Das werte Stück ist nun ein sehr wertgeschätztes Exemplar in ihrer Kollektion und im Schaufenster ausgestellt. „Genau das brauchte der Hut.“ Und ich bin mir sicher, dass Karin immer genau das richtige Händchen dafür haben wird, was sowohl Hüte als auch gut behütete Damen brauchen.

Kontakt

Hats by Sandy A
27/25-27 Hillview Dr
Buderim QLD 4556
0400022303

Millinery by Karin
Level 1, Centreway Arcade,
259 Collins Street
0395302201
0405037598

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *